Neighborhood Redevelopment and Jobs
Government Reform and Innovation
Education and Technology
A Clean and Safe City
3 Fun Ways To Change Da ‘Burgh!

3 Fun Ways To Change Da ‘Burgh!

SATURDAY: DJs FOR PEDUTO. Eleven DJs spinning, complimentary eats, door prizes, T-shirts for the first 50 in the door — all at the legendary Shadow Lounge. FREE!

SUNDAY: MUSICIANS FOR PEDUTO PRESENT JOHNNY CLASH NIGHT. Revel and rebel to the tunes of Johnny Cash and The Clash by an incredible lineup of bands! Hosted by Pittsburgh’s own Jimmy Krenn and David Conrad at the Diesel Lounge. $10!

MONDAY: EAST END SWEEP WEEK KICKOFF RALLY. We know you don’t need to get revved up for the last week before the election — you’re already there — but we’re holding a rally anyway! Enjoy great music, food and company all for FREE.

#11 Growing Our Neighborhoods: Attracting New Residents to Pittsburgh

#11 Growing Our Neighborhoods: Attracting New Residents to Pittsburgh

In the 2010 Census, Pittsburgh saw an across the board population increase of 22% for young residents between the ages of 20 and 24. Our median age decreased from about 35 years old to about 32 years old. And we welcomed thousands of young new residents to our neighborhoods; many who came from larger cities to take advantage of the lower cost of living and job opportunities here. We know that young people don’t just want trendy coffee shops and artist lofts, they want the same things all residents want: safe communities, vibrant business districts, and solid public transportation. New residents can be powerful growth engines for the city, and we need to find opportunities to attract new residents to move in, get college students to stay, and encourage kids who grew up in Pittsburgh to move back and be a part of our city’s future.

#12 Pittsburgh Transit Districts: Zoning for Transit Funding and Expansion

#12 Pittsburgh Transit Districts: Zoning for Transit Funding and Expansion

In 2004, the Pennsylvania General Assembly passed the Transit Revitalization Investment District (TRID) law. This law allows municipalities and redevelopment authorities to create TRID Districts so new revenue can be utilized to expand and create new public transit opportunities. Stakeholders in East Liberty are working on implementing the city’s first TRID District in conjunction with new developments in the area. The TRID will allow a portion of the new property taxes created through redevelopment efforts to be dedicated to improvements in public transit, pedestrian, and bicycle infrastructure in the surrounding area. Our hope is that this TRID District becomes a model that can be used in other neighborhoods. But creating TRID may not be enough. To supplement the district and ensure that the development within it is in line with the goals of expanding and creating transit opportunities, I will work with our City Planning Department to create the city’s first Transit Oriented Development zoning overlay.

#16 A Leader Who Can Work With Others: Building Coalitions to Change Pittsburgh

#16 A Leader Who Can Work With Others: Building Coalitions to Change Pittsburgh

The idea of “working with others” seems to be a reoccurring theme in this mayoral race. Let’s stop and think about what that means. Does “working with others” mean propping up the status quo? Or does it mean building broad and diverse coalitions to change Pittsburgh for the better? The former has kept the same few in power and the latter has opened the city to new voices, new approaches to development, new protections for workers and our environment, and new faces in city, county, and state government.

#19 Engaging the World: Sharing Ideas With Cities Across the Globe

#19 Engaging the World: Sharing Ideas With Cities Across the Globe

Pittsburgh has a success story to tell. We have turned around a total collapse of our economy and reemerged as a leading city in medicine, education, technology, and the arts. And the media has taken notice. Pittsburgh has been named the “Most Livable City” numerous times, been featured in national newspapers including the New York Times and Washington Post. Recently, I was even interviewed by the Canadian Broadcasting Company about the community efforts to restore East Liberty. The one thing missing from this success story is a Mayor and a city government that engages with other cities around the world on economic development, policy issues, and arts and culture. It’s great to have positive media promoting our city, but we need to think bigger and begin engaging with cities across the United States and beyond.

#20 Startup Roundtable: Helping to Create the Jobs of the Future

#20 Startup Roundtable: Helping to Create the Jobs of the Future

Pittsburgh’s startup economy has helped to build prosperity in the region and attract new jobs, new residents, and new investment. However, the growth of startup companies has slowed in recent years along with the venture capital dollars that fuel them. Pennsylvania as a whole, and the Pittsburgh region, are now lagging behind the rest of the country in new startup development. If we are to continue our growth as a city we must do better. We must find ways to jumpstart the development of new small businesses, especially those in emerging fields and new technology. Pittsburgh has the potential to be the Silicon Valley of our region. City government should be doing everything we can to nurture this development.

#21 Pittsburgh City Alert: A Mobile App to Keep You Connected

#21 Pittsburgh City Alert: A Mobile App to Keep You Connected

One of the most incredible technological advances of the past decade is the ability to simultaneously communicate with thousands of people via text message or a smart phone app. Agencies of the federal government, such as the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the National Weather Service, utilize free smart phone apps to keep citizens informed about issues ranging natural disasters to the daily weather forecast. Smart phone apps provide easy, immediate access to information and can play an important role in alerting citizens to everything from traffic conditions to school closings. The City of Pittsburgh should offer a free smart phone app that will keep residents, commuters, and visitors informed. And we should go even further by enabling this app to provide two-way communication so residents can report neighborhood issues such as potholes, illegal parking, or graffiti.

#22 Innovation Incubator: Supporting the Next Generation of Pittsburgh Entrepreneurs

#22 Innovation Incubator: Supporting the Next Generation of Pittsburgh Entrepreneurs

Pittsburgh’s tech and start up universe is rich and diverse and has been a major driver of our economic stability and growth over the past decade. However, recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and other agencies have shown Pittsburgh lagging in new job creation, especially in high-tech industries. The city has to be a strong partner with our emerging industries and work hand-in-hand to ensure that they are getting the public and private resources and opportunities they need to be successful. One of the best ways to do this is create new business incubators that provide the transitional space and resources for young firms in a collaborative, cooperative environment where they can learn from one another and from established firms in related fields. The idea is not to try to force innovation to happen where it is not already happening but to nurture organic startups and provide a bridge from start up to successful company.

Peduto Applauds State Insurance Dept. Highmark/WPAHS Decision

Peduto Applauds State Insurance Dept. Highmark/WPAHS Decision

“For nearly two years, I’ve stood with the community in advocating for this merger. The community’s diligence and hard work has paid off,” says Peduto. “Today Pennsylvania’s state insurance regulators have approved a plan for Highmark to merge with the financially troubled West Penn Allegheny Health System. This approval saves jobs and will allow for greater competition in Pittsburgh’s healthcare market as UPMC has shown business practices that are inconsistent with a purely public charity.”

#24 Clean Rivers, Green Jobs: Green Infrastructure as Economic Development Opportunity

#24 Clean Rivers, Green Jobs: Green Infrastructure as Economic Development Opportunity

The Allegheny County Sanitary Authority’s EPA-mandated wet weather plan calls for spending nearly $3 billion dollars over the next 10 to 20 years in order to reduce the pollutants that flow into our rivers after every rainstorm. This project represents the largest and most disruptive infrastructure undertaking in the City of Pittsburgh in our lifetimes. And ratepayers are going to bear the brunt of the costs, with rates going up as much as 200 to 300% for City of Pittsburgh residents. The current ALCOSAN proposal calls for the construction of massive concrete holding tanks under our rivers and an expansion of the ALCOSAN sewage treatment plant. Our polluted rivers are a serious problem that must be addressed but we have other problems, like flooding in our neighborhoods and erosion of our hillsides, that this plan does not address. If we are going to spend this much money and ask ratepayers to contribute more every month, this plan has to be reconsidered and we have to work to ensure that the community benefits flow from this massive investment of public resources. We can use this as an opportunity to green our neighborhoods, create good jobs, and alleviate flooding in our neighborhoods.