Tag: Sustainability

PA Sunshine Solar Rebates Still Available

PA Sunshine Solar Rebates Still Available

Have you installed or are thinking of installing solar electric (solar photovoltaic), solar hot water (solar thermal) or a battery back-up system on your home or small business but thought it was too late to obtain a PA Sunshine Solar Rebate? The good news is that there’s still almost $3 million worth of rebate money left in the program which was initiated in 2008 by the General Assembly under the Rendell Administration and administered by the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). More good news in that you can qualify for the rebate without needing to first obtain approval prior to project implementation to reserve funding (as in the old two-stop process).

Historic Preservation Rehabilitation Investment Tax Credit Workshop

Historic Preservation Rehabilitation Investment Tax Credit Workshop

There are more than a dozen registered historic districts in the City Of Pittsburgh. We have a treasure of both homes and public buildings that are more than one hundred years old — it’s part of what makes Pittsburgh special. But these buildings aren’t just beautiful to look at, they encourage economic development as people find neighborhoods with architectural character a desirable place to live. Additionally, preserving and adapting an existing building is a key element of sustainable development.

#3 Transforming Public Housing

#3 Transforming Public Housing

The Housing Authority of Pittsburgh controls nearly 6,000 public housing units and administers more than 6,000 Section 8 vouchers throughout the City of Pittsburgh. Our Housing Authority was the first created in Pennsylvania and one of the first in the nation. Many of the units and communities were constructed many years ago and are badly in need of modernization and better service provision. A recent independent audit revealed some serious concerns about how contracts are awarded by the authority and how services are provided. Public housing residents should not have to live in substandard conditions. They should not have to wait for an audit to see improvement in their communities.

Labor/Environmental Rally: “From Shovel to Broom, Peduto Stands for Clean Development & Good Jobs”

Labor/Environmental Rally: “From Shovel to Broom, Peduto Stands for Clean Development & Good Jobs”

A diverse alliance of labor, community and environmental groups rallied in support of Bill Peduto this morning. Peduto supporters from groups including 32BJ SEIU, The Sierra Club, United Steelworkers, UFCW, Ironworkers, IATSE, Clean Water Action, and the League of Conservation Voters gathered at the Gardens at Market Square—the first development which will be fully covered under the 2009 Service Worker Prevailing Wage Bill strongly supported by Bill Peduto.

#8 A Modern Zoning Code for a New Pittsburgh

#8 A Modern Zoning Code for a New Pittsburgh

Back when Pittsburgh’s zoning code was first rewritten, it was ahead of its time. The zoning code contained some forward-thinking development standards that advocated for environmental sustainability and the protection of our natural topography. It recognized the changing economic landscape of the city and moved us away from industrial development and instead towards education, medicine and neighborhood business districts. However, it has been nearly 20 years since our code was rewritten and much has changed in the field of city planning, the economy of our city, and development patterns and techniques nationwide. Therefore, we need to reassess our zoning code and find ways it can be streamlined, made easier to understand and comply with, and ensure it is compatible with our 21st century city. Rewriting a zoning code is no small task. It will require a great deal of community input, technical expertise, feedback from developers, and cooperation from all political stakeholders. But it is a task well worth taking on and one that I think can have a highly positive impact on the future development of our neighborhoods.

#24 Clean Rivers, Green Jobs: Green Infrastructure as Economic Development Opportunity

#24 Clean Rivers, Green Jobs: Green Infrastructure as Economic Development Opportunity

The Allegheny County Sanitary Authority’s EPA-mandated wet weather plan calls for spending nearly $3 billion dollars over the next 10 to 20 years in order to reduce the pollutants that flow into our rivers after every rainstorm. This project represents the largest and most disruptive infrastructure undertaking in the City of Pittsburgh in our lifetimes. And ratepayers are going to bear the brunt of the costs, with rates going up as much as 200 to 300% for City of Pittsburgh residents. The current ALCOSAN proposal calls for the construction of massive concrete holding tanks under our rivers and an expansion of the ALCOSAN sewage treatment plant. Our polluted rivers are a serious problem that must be addressed but we have other problems, like flooding in our neighborhoods and erosion of our hillsides, that this plan does not address. If we are going to spend this much money and ask ratepayers to contribute more every month, this plan has to be reconsidered and we have to work to ensure that the community benefits flow from this massive investment of public resources. We can use this as an opportunity to green our neighborhoods, create good jobs, and alleviate flooding in our neighborhoods.

Celebrate Earth Day With Bill Peduto

Celebrate Earth Day With Bill Peduto

Earth Day is coming up on Monday, April 22nd, and I’d love for you to join me and a hundred of our closest friends to celebrate in style at the Mansions on Fifth from 6-8pm.

#47 Strengthening Ties With Allegheny County Leaders: Creating City-County Working Groups

#47 Strengthening Ties With Allegheny County Leaders: Creating City-County Working Groups

The City of Pittsburgh is the population and economic center of Allegheny County and tens of thousands of Allegheny County residents come to the city every day to work, visit restaurants, and attend events. The city and county are inherently linked in many ways, including in many of the challenges we face. Issues like the water quality of our rivers and streams, the flooding that plagues many of our neighborhoods, the funding of our public transportation system, the assessment of property taxes, and economic development planning require close cooperation and good working partnerships between officials at the city and county levels. As Mayor, I will build on existing relationships and create new ones to strengthen our partnership with the county to the benefit of all residents of Pittsburgh and the region.

#48 Energy Benchmarking: Using Technology to Make Our Buildings More Efficient

#48 Energy Benchmarking: Using Technology to Make Our Buildings More Efficient

The energy used by buildings to keep our offices, stores, homes, and stadiums heated in the winter, cooled in the summer, and lighted all year round represents a significant portion of the total energy used every year. It also represents a lot of greenhouse gases pumped into the atmosphere and a lot of money wasted on inefficiencies. Cities around the country have started to look more closely at how large buildings use energy, and through this process of examining usage they have been able to take concrete steps to make buildings more efficient and save energy and money. Through partnerships with the federal government, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and organizations like Citizens for Pennsylvania’s Future and the Green Building Alliance, we can create a program to help building owners and managers track their energy use and make adjustments to save them energy and money.

#57 Walk Your City: Showcasing Neighborhoods Through Pedestrian Way-finding

#57 Walk Your City: Showcasing Neighborhoods Through Pedestrian Way-finding

Encouraging pedestrians to get out and walk their neighborhoods is one of the best ways to increase public health, keep eyes on our streets, and keep our neighborhood business districts vibrant. However, most of our way-finding and place-making infrastructure is geared toward drivers, is outdated, and was created in a top-down manner without much input from residents and community groups. We should gear our way-finding tools to appeal to and support pedestrians and cyclists as well as drivers. These tools should help find innovative ways to get residents and neighborhoods involved to promote local attractions and businesses and to create a stronger, more vibrant, human-scale city.